Traffic and Link Exchanges

traffic exchanges

This topic is very closely related to link exchanges. The difference is more quantitative than qualitative, actually. But still, there’s a number of things to keep in mind here which are subtle differences between ordinary link swapping and the more “all-out” traffic swapping. In the process of looking at all this, we will inevitably repeat some of the link exchange concepts – which can never hurt.

Linking Strategies

Links to your site from other sites drive additional traffic. But since Google and other major search engines consider the number of incoming links to your website (“link popularity”) as an important indicator of relevance, more links will help you rank higher in the search engines. Google has a measure called PageRank that reflects the quantity and quality of incoming links. All links aren’t all equal. Links from trusted, popular sites help your site rank higher than links from lower traffic sites.

Traffic exchanges don’t give you quality visitors but their banner exchanges do. Except, because people who run website know how ads work they usually don’t click them.

So… the best way to get quality traffic, in my opinion, is to use a banner exchange, buy advertising, or the best way, participate in a forum about your topic and simply use a signature with a promo.

A traffic exchange is a type of website which provides a service for webmasters in exchange for traffic. It is similar to the autosurf concept with the exception that traffic exchanges usually use a manual rotation.

A traffic exchange website receives website submissions from webmasters that join traffic exchange networks. The person who submitted the website then has to browse other member sites on the exchange program to earn credits, which enable their sites to be viewed by other members through the surf system. This increases the number of visitors to all the sites involved.

Exchanges enforce a certain credit ratio, which illustrates the amount of websites the surfer must view in order to receive one hit through the program for their promoted website. Many sites offer the ability to upgrade one’s membership level for a more equal credit ratio.

As the viewers are all website owners or affiliates, it is possible that some might find certain member sites interesting and thus make note of them on their own sites, sending more traffic their way. Most traffic programs also impose a time limit when members are browsing, ranging from 10 seconds to 60 seconds. Some incorporate the use of captcha to ensure user interaction.

Almost all traffic exchange programs are free, although many of them offer special features to paid members and offer credits for purchase. Almost all traffic exchange programs encourage users to build their own referral networks, which in turn increases the referrers’ amount of credits.

The traffic generated in a traffic exchange can be leveraged by using a downline builder to assist the user in building a referral network in the many different traffic exchanges.

In practice, traffic exchange programs are generally used by small business owners or marketers who either want free advertsing or use the exchange programs for low-budget advertisement campaigns.

Link Exchanges

A reciprocal link is a mutual link between two objects, commonly between two websites to ensure mutual traffic. For example, Alice and Bob have websites. If Bob’s website links to Alice’s website, and Alice’s website links to Bob’s website, the websites are reciprocally linked. Website owners often submit their sites to reciprocal link exchange search engines. Reciprocal linking between websites is an important part of the search engine optimization process because Google uses link popularity algorithms (defined as the number of links that led to a particular page and the anchor text of the link) to rank websites for relevancy. directories, in order to achieve higher rankings in the

Resource Links are a category of links, which can be either one-way or two-way, usually referenced as “Resources” or “Information” in navbars, but sometimes, especially in the early, less compartmentalized years of the Web, simply called “links”. Basically, they are hyperlinks to a website or a specific webpage containing content believed to be beneficial, useful and relevant to visitors of the site establishing the link.

In recent years, resource links have grown in importance because most major search engines have made it plain that — in Google’s words– “quantity, quality, and relevance of links count towards your rating.”

The engines’ insistence on resource links being relevant and beneficial developed because many artificial link building methods were employed solely to “spam” search-engines, i.e. to “fool” the engines’ algorithms into awarding the sites employing these unethical devices undeservedly high page ranks and/or return positions.

Despite cautioning site developers (again quoting from Google) to avoid “‘free-for-all’ links, link popularity schemes, or submitting your site to thousands of search engines (because) these are typically useless exercises that don’t affect your ranking in the results of the major search engines — at least, not in a way you would likely consider to be positive,”most major engines have deployed technology designed to “red flag” and potentially penalize sites employing such practices.

Link Exchange definition from Wikipedia

A link exchange is a confederation of websites that operates similarly to a web ring. Webmasters register their web sites with a central organization, that runs the exchange, and in turn receive from the exchange HTML code which they insert into their web pages. In contrast to a web ring, where the HTML code simply comprises simple circular ring navigation hyperlinks, in a link exchange the HTML code causes the display of banner advertisements, for the sites of other members of the exchange, on the member web sites, and webmasters have to create such banner advertisements for their own web sites.The banners are downloaded from the exchange. A monitor on the exchange determines, from referral informationweb browsers, how many times a member web site has displayed the banner advertisements of other members, and credits that member with a number of displays of its banner on some other member’s web site. Link exchanges usually operate on a 2:1 ratio, such that for every two times a member shows a second member’s banner advertisement, that second member displays the first member’s banner advertisement. This page impressions:credits ratio is the exchange rate.[1][3][4] supplied by

One of the earliest link exchanges was LinkExchange, a company that is now owned by Microsoft.

1 Comment

  1. So great article. I enjoyed reading it.

    Reply

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